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contravention of the fourth amendment and complete contravention of the law at that time. as i'm sure and many of my colleagues will certainly recall this was revealed to the american public four years later when it was reported in "the new york times" in 2005. and in response after years of back and forth contentious debate, congress passed the fisa amendments act, the bill that we are considering on this floor today. we're considering a reauthorization. this law gave the government new surveillance authorities, but it also included a sunset provision to ensure that congress examines where the law is working and the way it was intended. now, the debate we're having right now on this floor is that reexamination. i will just note that i think it's unfortunate that we're doing this at the last second. we have known that this intelligence law is going to expire for years. it was laid out for a multiyear span. and certainly, it is irresponsible for this chamber to be debating this bill under a falsely created pressure that it needs to be done without any amendments in order to match the bill from
and graduation. it breeds hypocrisy within the school and encourages a scoff law at tuesday among college officials. papers over the prop of why so many latinos and blacks are academically competitive, and it gives states and schools involved in unsavory activities -- like decides which racial minorities will be heard and which ones not -- and how much blood is needed to establish group membership. and i didn't want even mention mismatch. -- i didn't even mention mismatch. [laughter] the mismatch book, in addition to o giving chapter or and verse and ample, irrefutable documentation for why this is a real problem also touches on some of these other problems that i've listed too. you add all those up, okay, and it seems to me that it's a lot stronger than the educational benefits from these random interracial conversations we might be having more of if we use racial preferences in admissions. okay. well, let me wrap up with one sort of happy note, but then one not so happy note. it seems to me -- and i think it ought to seem to the justices -- that one reason why we ought to end this nonse
vote on something then. the senate could also pass it and signed into law. gregg: right. >> everyone is talking about there is not enough time. this is not true. congress can do whatever it wants. if they agree, the two parties agree congress can pass things very quickly the trick is getting both sides to agree. gregg: it is always small ball and it is never really significant. which shows an utter lack of courage. and the american people, you know, feel that way too about their representatives. put up on the "gallup poll." "gallup poll", likelihood of averting the fiscal cliff. there you see, susan, people are losing faith. i'm actually surprised that they haven't lost all faith. >> actually i was going to say the same thing. i think that number is pretty surprising. i would think it is much higher at this point. perhaps the public is getting used to this kind of game they play chicken and at the last second they come up with a deal. remember august 2011, we thought the nation was running out of money, we would hit the debt ceiling, government would partially shut down, literally at
, in the napa valley. >> glor: and that is not all. apart from the fiscal cliff debate, some other laws are due to expire january 1, and that could cost americans plenty. for starters, the payroll tax break will end. social security taxes will go from 4.2% back to 6.2%. if the farm bill is allowed to expire, it is feared milk prices could rise sharply. hundreds of american families are heartbroken tonight after russian president vladimir putin ban all adoption of russian children by americans. it is believed to be retaliation for a new u.s. law that targets human rights abuses in russia. in the past two decadees, more than 60,000 russian children have been given new homes inside the u.s. it elaine quijano met one family whose adoption is now on hold. >> look at this. look. >> reporter: two years ago kim and robert summers decided to adopt from russia. it took nearly 18 months, but last july, the couple was matched with a 15-month-old boy. when you saw his picture for the first time, what did you think? >> i knew that this was the child i was meant to parent. and i took one look at this little g
its attention to renewing a controversial surveillance law. they spent hours on this yesterday. some people say it violates the rights of americans. we'll look at the pros and the cons. stay with us. harris: new information about the u.s. soldier accused of killing 16 afghan villagers in a predawn rampage. the u.s. army is now saying it will seek the death penalty against staff sergeant robert bales. he faces premeditated murder and other charges in the attack on the villages that left 16 people dead among them women and children in southern afghanistan. that happened back in march. the attack drew such angry protests in the country the u.s. temporarily halted combat operations there. bales says attorney says his client should not serve the death penalty because he was serving the fourth deployment in a war zone. he is serving in fort lewis mccord in washington state. let's talk with a former prosecutor. >> thanks for having me. harris: let's start with what the defense team is saying. multiple deployments are a defense. why? >> they're saying because of multiple deployments there wa
extreme mental illness with several rights laws is a deeper issue than gun control. >host: how should vice president joe biden and the white house address this. mental illness is part of the debate and will be part of the solution. >> i think they really need to look at civil rights laws and be able to intervene more aggressively with mental health professionals when people show a consistent pattern of mental illness. i think you can travel through any city in america and see massive amounts of people who are not capable of taking care of themselves. as a society, we are not humanitarian when we leave them to defend themselves. >host: this argument is not new. it is highlighted in the extensive report in "the washington post." the chair of the senate judiciary committee, joe biden, we will hear from him. the witness testifies and next to him is sarah brady whose husband was shot during the reagan assassination attempt back in 1981, jim brady. still law was named after him. let's take you back to that hearing -- [video clip] >> life is completely shattered. my daughter's life is completely
of becoming law. that is what i said back on july 25. we allow that vote and i said we knew it did not pass constitutional muster and that democrats would proceed to a revenue bill that originated in the house as the constitution requires if they were serious and as i called on them to do last week. the so-called senate bill is no more than a glorified sense of the senate revolution. let's put that talking point aside. host: mitch mcconnell -- or is a story from politico.com, "why they will not go over the cliff." "they see an advantage in negotiating with republicans that will feel free not to raise taxes once the rates have gone out. the president is pulling in the mid 50's. there is still time for the dynamic to shift. speed banner will stress the house has passed legislation to avert the entire fiscal cliff. there is an ad we want to point out in "the new york times" and "the washington post." together" rds "come as a way to send a message to congress. "the struggle of today is for a vast future also." the words of abraham lincoln. jim from georgia on the republican line. caller: thank
to compromise. >> senator lindsey graham was "meet the press this morning. >> we are one law away from solving this problem. this problem runs deep and wide. i live in south carolina and chuck lives in new york. i understand how he was brought up. maybe he tries to understand how i was rabrought up. people where i live i have been christmas shopping have been coming up to me, please don't let the government take my guns away. >> how realistic do you think that is? >> chuck is my boss. anything chuck says absolutely 100%. >> who said there wasn't politics on the show today? >> it's a rhetorical question because president obama himself has mentioned on the streets of chicago you need one set of gun rules and in wyoming maybe it is something else. i think we have seen that kind of regionalization of laws. connecticut had an assault weapons ban that didn't prevent this tragedy from happening and didn't outlaw the kind of gun you would want to be outlawed for that kind of tragedy. i don't know that the federal government will be able to slice and dice. it will be very difficult and very close if th
was described as an antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving me the chance to be here. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. -- david corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. senator byrd was the majority leader during the period of time i wrote about. it gives you an ensemble sense of how the senate works. the book originated in 2008. i had been in the senate in the 1970s and 1980s. by 2008, i decided the senate had become utterly unrecognizable to me. polarized and paralyzed, really quite dysfunctional. i decided to write a book about the senate when it was great, specifically when i was there. [laughter] when you do something like that, you ha
. >> with that perspective, now that the affordable care act will begin to become fully finalized into law over the next couple years, we keep hearing those on the conservative side is concerns about what it will do to the country. what are your concerns? will this be a good thing? >> yes, it will. right now, we have $50 billion a year of uncompensated care. people who do not have insurance, do not have medicaid, medicare, private insurance, mode carry coverage, they are not insured. they have access to health care in emergency rooms and if they cannot pay, and they do not go to bankruptcy, it costs -- the care does not go away. it is shifted to the rest of us who do have insurance. $50 billion. it could be as much as $1,500 per person. paying for those who do not. you have everybody in the system all injured one way or another, then the uncompensated care goes away. it is no longer borne by those of us who are beneficiaries of an insurance program. that alone is a hidden tax people do not focus on unless it is pointed out to them. it raises the cost to everyone else. the fact never gets talked about. s
the burmese people live under a fully democratic government that is transparent and respect the rule of law we must continue to push for reform. suu kyi said in oslo she accepted the nobel peace prize, quote, the piece of the world is as long as negative forces, the better forces anywhere for all at risk. every citizen of the world including those who live in the most free and safest conditions of the debt of gratitude to the helpful souls who put their lives on the line for democracy and freedom. there is no better example of that than the guest we have here today. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the united states secretary of state, the hon. hillary rodham clinton. [applause] >> 17 years ago, as we were in beijing on behalf of the un conference concerning the rights of women, we fought about many of the women around the world who could not be with us but whose presence was a strong message of the values that we were promoting, values that were not just american values but universal values. madeleine albright left that conference in beijing, taking with harry poster signed by all the amer
be opened in your child's name. now we have a law to try and stop that from happening. the first state in the nation to do it. sara sam son has more. >> a recent study finds one in ten children have had their social security numbers compromised in some way. according to the maryland attorney general's office, that's the low estimate. that's because some victims don't know they are victims. >> a child won't find out until they get to be an age where they have to apply for credit. >> a new law going into effect january 1st aims to keep kid's identity safe. the legislation is the first of its kind in the country. >> we want to make sure that children and other protective persons have an opportunity to freeze their credit report. >> it will alaw a parent or guardian to freeze credit reports of children or disabled adults. you don't even need reason to believe their identity is at risk. the attorney general's office recommends you do it as a precaution. >> that's what we recommend if a child has been a victim of identity theft then there's no charge placing a freeze on the credit report. if
into law. if you're among republicans is if you reach an agreement now and agree to tax increases, the spending cuts will get undone or never will be followed through on. that's one of the things that has held back talks, because republicans are skeptical that democrats will follow through. host: charles is on the independent line from colorado. caller: good morning, steve. i listened to it the myopic dogma in this segment over and over. the only people i can blame on this are the american people. the people who sit here and listen to these guys that are extremists and and they vote him into office -- them into office. i hear people say let's get rid of epa. if you look at how much epa takes out of our budget, that's like worrying about nothing gary people need to turn off the tv and start studying more. crack some books. look at economic spirit trickle-down economics does not work. name a country where it has worked? maybe estonia. but it's not working in greece. i heard a great saying that says when time gets tough, everyone is a keynesian. turn off the tv. not c-span of course.
up with a solution that will become law. address fiscal challenges while protecting families. >> may i inquire how much time on each side? >> 7 and 14 minutes. >> the gentleman from new york. >> thank you. i yield 3 minutes to the gentleman from texas. >> recognized for 3 minutes. >> i thank the gentle lady and the chairman. when i mention the words hurricane sandy and the tragedy in newton, connecticut, many would wonder what do they have in common. an enormous gun tragedy and the loss of 26 lives, and americans suffering from a devastating storm. our hearts go out to those babies lost. it speaks to americans in need. that is why i am so trouble to be on the floor today. the framework we have says to america when you are in need, we will not be prepared to help you. what is disappointing, and i know for the speaker, it is probably the same case. just about three days ago, we thought there was a deal between the white house and the framework offered and the leadership of this house. it is disappointing. in the course of a couple of days, we have come to a situation where this plan, p
a archaic 1947 law, unless the new bill is passed by december 31st, the government will be forced to buy vast quantities of milk at twice the wholesale rate. two bills are in congress. the senate passed one for $23 billion in savings. the house is looking to enact 35 billion. the sticking point the full house of representatives hasn't approved the bill. >> the farm bill is like this low hanging ornament on the congressional christmas tree that if they just embrace it, they can automatically come up with tens of billions of dollars in budget savings. and then they can figure out where else they need to cut spending after that. >> reporter: the secretary of agriculture tom vilsack has said his department is preparing a case the permanent law comes into effect. temporary solution is to attach a farm bill extension to the fiscal cliff legislation. harris? harris: is there anything besides milk we need to be aware of? are we looking potentially at higher prices among many farming commodities for example? >> reporter: yeah. it is not just the cows. it is the crops too. it is possibility the go
to president vladimir putin whether he signs it in to law and today he gave every indication he will. he told a meeting so far i see no reason not to sign it although i have to review the final text and weigh everything. if it comes in to law on january 1st, it is uncertainty for around 46 american families who have adoptions being processed right now. criticism has come from the state department which says it is misguided to link the fate of children to unrelated political considerations. but criticism also in russia and from within president putin's own party. that's because russia has an adoption problem. last year, more than 100,000 children living in state institutions and russians themselves do not adopt in large numbers. in comparison over the last two decades, more than 60,000 russian children have been taken in by american families. no other country helps more. some russian politicians say it's an embarrassment their country doesn't care for its own and they hope the bill will encourage people to act. craig? >> duncan, from our london bureau today, thank you. sir, do appreciate that.
's got no chance whatsoever of becoming law, end quote. that's what i said back on july 25th. the only reason we ever allowed that vote on that proposal, as i said at that time, was that we knew it didn't pass constitutional muster and that democrats were really serious they would proceed to a revenue bill that originated in the house, as the constitution requires, and as i called on them to do again last week. to repeat, the so-called senate bill is nothing more than a glorified sense of the senate resolution so let's put that convenient talking point aside from here on out. last night i told the president we'd be happy to look at whatever he proposes, but the truth is we're coming up against a hard deadline here, and as i said this is a conversation we should have had months ago. and republicans aren't about to write a blank check for anything senate democrats put forward just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. that wouldn't be fair to the american people. that having been said, we'll see what the president has to propose. members on both sides of the aisle will revi
. ackman. >> they also hired shiller, the law firm. not clear why they would hire a law firm at this point. no reason given. they have hired them, which is another, hmm, wonder what they're up to kind of move. bob pisani is on the floor with what's moving today. >> we're up 24 points in the dow. and a lot of people think a grand bargain is impossible at this point. but president obama coming back from vacation in hawaii. that's an indication that some kind of deal -- however small -- is definitely coming. i want to point out, and i know you've been negative on this mastercard data on retail sales, and everybody thinks it's going to be a mess for the holiday season. i want to point out that the stocks are not acting that way. that this is a disaster for the season. the s&p retail index hit an historic high on december 3rd. historic high. since then, it has only been down about 3%. these stocks are not acting like there's a disaster. i can give you several reasons why they're not down so far. number one, we are going to see eps growth in the fourth quarter from some of them because of the ex
george w. bush signed into law. his wife, former first lady laura bush, is with us today, as is her predecessor, secretary of state hillary clinton. coming together in mutual respect, a step from the chambers where we passionately debate the issues of the day that has become almost second nature to us. but it is a blessing, and we will hear over and over during the course of this ceremony, aung san suu kyi has shown the world just how hard one it really is. on behalf of the congress, let me express how humble and honored we are by your presence here in the rotunda of the united states capitol. >> ladies and gentlemen, please stand for the presentation of the callers by the united states armed forces color guard, the singing of our national anthem, and the retiring of the colors. ♪ ♪ ♪ oh say can you see by the dawn's early light, what so proudly we hail at the twilight's last gleaming, whose broad stripes and bright stars, through the perilous fight, o'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming, and the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air, i gave proof t
"unconventional laws." it's an article about how some state laws may seem strange to many residents. one that mandates bicycle riders should keep one hand on the handle bars at all times or get this you could face 90 days in jail or a fine of up to $750. >>> well, three days now to go. you've been hearing about this fiscal cliff. i know you're tired of hearing of it. you've got three more days to hear of it. we might be going off that cliff here shortly. it's the focus right now in d.c. but it's also our focus, the senate in particular. majority leader harry reid and minority leader mitch mcconnell are rushing trying to put together a last-ditch agreement for a bargain, some kind of a bipartisan bargain. joining me right now political editor for the pbs news hour and white house reporter for the "washington post." hello to you both. okay. last minute deal. christina, do we have time for this? i mean, i talked to representative cummings. most of the representatives are not even in washington, d.c. right now. if they hammer something out in the senate, do we have enough time to make it by
up by law. every americans' paychecks will get considerably smaller. that would be the wrong thing to do for our economy, it would be bad for middle-class families, and it would be bad for businesses that depend on family spending. congress can prevent it if they act right now. i just had a good and constructive discussion here at the white house with leadership about how to prevent the tax hike on the middle class. we may reach an agreement that can pass both houses in time. senators reid and mcconnell are working on such an agreement as we speak, but if an agreement is not reached in time between senator reid and senator mcconnell, then i will urge senator reid to bring to the floor a basic package for an up or down vote to protect the middle class from an income tax hike, extends the vital lifeline of unemployment insurance to 2 million americans looking for a job, and lays the groundwork for future cooperation on more economic growth and deficit reduction. i believe such a proposal could pass both houses with bipartisan majorities as long as those leaders allow it to come to a
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21

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